Alan Bissett

"A stunning piece of theatre" – TIME magazine on The Pure, the Dead & the Brilliant

Plays

COLLECTED PLAYS (2015)

The Ching Room

The Moira Monologues

Turbo Folk

Ban This Filth!

Jock: Scotland on Trial

Jacquoranda

The Incredible Adam Spark

The Pure, the Dead and the Brilliant

These are the collected plays of one of Scotland’s brightest, award-winning literary and theatrical talents. Includes the scripts for The Ching Room, set entirely in a nightclub toilet, The Moira Monologues, Bissett’s one-woman tour de force, The Red Hourglass, a play narrated by spiders, and Ban this Filth!, Bissett’s bold examination of pornography, radical feminism and the life of Andrea Dworkin.

Introduction by David MacLennan, producer of A Play, a Pie and a Pint

Praise for The Moira Monologues

‘**** This is brilliant stuff, an exhilaratingly fresh take on the whole business of class and culture in Scotland. It’s also so funny that some in the audience were literally shouting with laughter.’
Scotsman

‘**** Bissett writes with eagle-eyed vim – “works in Somerfield, looks like a stoat” runs one typical pen portrait – and not a word is wasted. His Moira lurches from a foul-mouthed Rottweiler who could give Malcolm Tucker a run for his money to maudlin softie in the time it takes to smoke a cigarette.’
Independent

Praise for The Ching Room

‘**** Has subtle depth as a meditation on drug culture…The character of Darren is a demon for ABMoira_BY_NeilThomasDouglasour times.’
Scotsman

‘**** As tight as a short drama set in a toilet cubicle should be…A curiously compelling little play…A script riddled with priceless back-alley gems.’
Herald

Praise for Ban this Filth!

‘**** genuinely fascinating exploration of feminism, pornography, and the ingrained individualism we plant into issues which stretch far beyond just ourselves’
National Collective

‘**** The brilliant Scottish writer Alan Bissett … What’s striking is the grace and discipline … He is eloquent and very funny … Bold in his use of audience participation and physical theatre … Oddly magnificent.’
Scotsman